gale

learning to braid: reading the hunger games

It has been brought to my attention that I must be one of the very last people in the known universe that has not seen or read the Hunger Games trilogy. Not that I have been actively avoiding them, they’ve just been a thing I hadn’t got round to doing.

With the release of the Mockingjay Part One trailer and my new job in a spoiler-filled cinema, I figured it might be about time to join the ranks and fight the Capitol.

With this in mind, I set myself a challenge fit for Katniss Everdeen. The Challenge: to read the Hunger Games trilogy in a week. The Competitor: this totally-not-prepared and already sleep-deprived Cat. The Prize: the respect of my fellow housemates and friends, as well as the strength to face my job free from the fear of spoilers.

So far, my achievement list includes the first book, The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins,  which I managed to read in under 24 hours.

The opening was a little slow and heavy with description which made the start feel a little dry and drab and didn’t really attach me to Katniss in the way I was initially expecting.

However, once the story picked up and the tributes were announced, I found myself totally sucked in to the world. The description was dispersed through the immense amounts of action and excitement, and even when nothing was happening plot-wise, something was always happening, character-wise. There is a brilliant balance between being plot-driven and character-driven which makes this book a page turner.

I will throw out a little warning. It is pretty confronting. I think I was less shocked because I was told by so many people how gruesome, gory or intense it was, so I wasn’t overwhelmed by what happened mostly, but there were definitely still some moments that pulled at the heartstrings (as well as the gag reflex).

At points, I found I had distanced myself and had forgotten the age or circumstances of the characters, but whenever this happened, there seemed to be an action or event that pulled me right back in to the confronting and harsh circumstances and the childish age of the characters.

Despite my best efforts, I did have a few spoilers up my sleeve, which I thought would have taken some of the pressure or stress out of the plot, but surprisingly and luckily it didn’t.

Instead I found myself still fearing for the characters, trying to figure out their next moves and trying to figure out the plot twists before they occurred. On the final two fronts, I was unsuccessful, still being constantly surprised by the characters, plot and writing.

The timing is perfect and Collins has created the suspense and tension in the book that regardless of what knowledge you had before, you genuinely connect with and fear for the characters. I definitely developed a respect and connection with Katniss and found myself easily falling in love with Peeta (I assume in this I am not alone!).

I also found myself strangely attached to some of the fringe characters, like Foxface, who was developed through Katniss’ limited experiences. These characterisations are obviously from Katniss’ point of view and I found myself sharing a lot of her respect and intrigue for some of them.

The first book for me was a total success and I’m very glad there are two more books to follow. I’m aiming to have the second book done by Thursday and the final book done by Saturday, so stay tuned.

From the reader who has already read the first page of the next book,

The Cat