Children’s literature

getting a little foxy: reading fantastic mr fox

With yesterday being National Bookshop Day and the arrival of my wonderful new cousin a few weekends ago, this week I got a little nostalgic. I went through my bookshelf, making a mental list of all the fantastic books my new cousin will one day read.

When my eye fell on Roald Dahl’s Fantastic Mr Fox, I knew I had to read it again. My copy is only eighty-one pages long and in fairly large print (meaning, like a rebel, I didn’t even get up to get my glasses!). Just like every other time, I read the book in one sitting, flying through the crazy antics of these wild animals. And like every other time, I loved every word.

I think it is a real toast to Roald Dahl that his books are still loved and read, and that as a twenty-one year old literature student, I still pore over the words he wrote. There is something in the characters and the simple but exciting plot that means the book can be read and re-read and still be enjoyed each time.

This is my first review on an illustrated book and I can’t leave them unmentioned. I can’t imagine a Roald Dahl book without the simple but intricate illustrations of Quentin Blake. I have always adored these illustrations and went through a phase where all my school books and notepads were covered in poor attempts at imitating this style when drawing my teachers. There is definitely more skill in detailing the over-extended nose or drooping ear lobes of a person than I had first anticipated. Kudos to Quentin Blake. 

This book is something that can be read by anyone. The words aren’t long and the illustrations are fun and exciting, meaning it is great for the intended child audience, but the great writing and wonderful characters mean adults can still enjoy the book too.

I am seriously looking forward to adding this book to ever-growing pile that I am hoping to one day read to my lovely cousin.

From the reader who knows the real answer to the question ‘What does the fox say?’,

The Cat

Advertisements